Swanky Den is supported by readers like you. If you purchase through one of our links we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How to Troubleshoot a Power Lift Chair

How to trouble shoot a power lift chair

Has your power lift chair recently stopped working? The problem may be due to a failure in either the hand control, motor, or electrical supply. Troubleshooting your power lift chair will help you to understand the problem.

Once you know what has gone wrong, you’ll be able to fix it. Make sure to check if your chair is under a warranty. If so, you’ll be able to replace the chair or individual parts for free.


How do you Troubleshoot a Lift Chair?

There are several things that can go wrong in a lift chair. The most common mechanical and electrical failures occur in motor or hand control. Follow these steps to troubleshoot your lift chair.

Motor and Power Supply Issues

To troubleshoot the motor, you’re going to need an 18v battery. You can make this by using two 9v batteries in a circuit. Join them together next to each other, this will work in tandem to generate 18v.

First, unplug the motor and control box cable from the control box. Once you’ve done this, you will have exposed the prongs of the plug. You can then access the motor without using the power supply.

Depending on if this works or not, you will know where the error is between the motor and power supply.

You can then connect the 18v battery to the motor cable. If the chair does not move, flip the connecting wires around. This will provoke the chair to begin to move. If it doesn’t move, then you have discovered that your problem lies in your motor.

If it can move, there may be a problem with your power supply. Check that other objects work when plugged into the same socket. A lamp is a good testing item for this.

If a lamp can light up from the same socket, that proves your power socket is fine. That means your power supply is no longer working.

Hand Control Box Issues

lift chair power control box

If you think your hand control box may be the problem, you can also troubleshoot that.

First of all, function a jump wire by unwinding a paper clip into a straight line. You can also use a measure of copper wire. The copper wire and paper clip will need to be around two inches long.

Once you have created this tool, remove and detach the hand control. You can locate the hand control on the side of the lift chair. In doing this, you will expose the DIN female plug.

Using your new tool, push into pin one and pin two. This will trigger the chair to revert back to a seating position. Next, push down pins 1 and four. If your chair still moves, you can rule out a failure in the control box.

If the pins don’t cause any movement, you will be able to replace the hand control for between $60-90.

First, remove the old hand control. Unlatch the panel and then disconnect it. You can then attach your new control in place and close the latch.


What are the Parts of a Power Lift Chair?

Recliner Power Lift Chair Parts

The main parts of a power lift chair are the motor, hand control, and power supply.

The power supply is what leads from your wall socket into your power lift chair. This will use electricity to power the other parts of your lift chair. If this isn’t working, your chair won’t be able to move.

The motor is what navigates the movement of all the parts. The motor will use electrical power to lift the chair upwards, giving it movement and motion. If this is not working, the chair may get stuck during its movement or will not quite lift correctly. This can be a big problem when the chair gets stuck in one position.

The hand control is what a person will use to control the movements of the chair. Normally coming out the side of the recliner, you can press buttons on this to change the direction of the chair. If this is not working, you won’t be able to control your chair. This, again, leaves the chair stuck in one position.


How Long do Lift Chairs Last?

Most power lift chairs will last for about 10 years. Many retailers offer a warranty that guarantees a period of time between 5-10 years. You can replace any faulty parts during this period.

This will put your mind at ease, you knowing you can replace your chair if anything goes wrong.

Of course, a chair will last different lengths depending on how well you treat it. If you are careful, the chair can last long past the 10-year cap.


How Much Does it Cost to Repair a Lift Assist Chair?

Depending on which part of the lift assist chair has failed, the price to fix will differ.

Lift Assist Chair PartCost for Part
Replacement Motor$100-$300
Hand Control$50-$90
Power Supply$50-$150

For a replacement motor, you will be looking at roughly $100-300. Make sure to get a model that is compatible with your chair.

For a new hand control, you will have to spend anywhere between $50-90.

A new power supply will cost you between $50-150.

These are average prices. However, if you contact your closest retailer directly, they may have better deals for you.


Does Medicare cover lift chair repairs?

Medicare coverage for power lift chair repair

Yes, in some cases Medicare does cover lift chair repairs.

If you want to qualify for Medicare coverage for your chair, a doctor must submit a certificate for you.

You can apply for one of these if you have severe arthritis of your knee or hip. If you’re unable to stand up on your own and can move once stood, you can also qualify.

Similarly, Medicare will cover you if your medical history shows you need it. If you have a history of issues with standing up, you can get Medicare help.


Wrapping Up How to Trouble Shoot Power Lift Chairs

There are three main places you should start when troubleshooting your lift chair. The first of these is the power supply. Check that your power supply is firmly secured and working. If you’re sure it is, test out the hand control to make sure everything is in order.

If both the motor and power supply are working, it is likely that you have a problem with your motor.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *